Controlling rampant weeds can be hard to do, especially if your weeds are the strong and resilient type like crabgrass or dandy lions. Once a particular weed has established itself on your lawn, removing it can be a long and difficult process. You're faced with a few decisions when dealing with a rampant weed infestation: treat aggressively with weed control and spray the whole lawn; try natural techniques for removal; pick them out by hand; or spot spray with weed control and hope for the best. Unfortunately, proper and effective weed control doesnít involve a single, universal solution. And with the recent pesticide ban, effective treatment options may be limited. It requires experience and expertise to ensure the best approach is taken to ensure you win the battle for a healthy, lush and beautiful lawn.

A FEW FACTS ABOUT WEEDS:

  • Weed control cannot kill the seed of a weed, only weeds that are actively growing.  It is not a preventative measure.
  • One weed control application is not sufficient for the entire growing season, as several crops of weeds will emerge over the course of the year.
  • For treating dandelions, applying weed control as soon as they appear would result in the more stubborn weeds persisting, as they donít usually surface as early.

A FEW FACTS ABOUT CRABGRASS:

  • Crabgrass is a very fast-growing plant that grows low to the ground (opposed to quackgrass/twitchgrass that grows higher than your regular grass) and starts to germinate in mid-May to early June.
  • Crabgrass control is applied pre-emergent and post-emergent.
  • It is very important that our office be notified if you have the crabgrass control program in your order and notice crabgrass germinating between our regular visits.  This is the only way we can keep on top of it.
  • Crabgrass on boulevards, on areas next to pavement, in thin areas, and in bare patches is especially difficult to control and no guarantees can be made.  Our goal is to eliminate the crabgrass in healthy stands of grass. This is why proper cutting, fertilizing, seeding, and watering are important in establishing healthy turf.